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Volunteer Highlights: Saturday

 

April 12, 2014
 
Happy National Volunteer Week! Every day we will be highlighting some of the amazing volunteers of Let’s Talk Science. See below for today’s spectacular people:
 
Jay
 
Jay (Ji Yeon) Yoon
Let’s Talk Science office volunteer
 
Position, Company (or past position): Clerk , Canada Revenue Agency
 
Number of years volunteering with us:  1 year
 
Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science?: I have a high interested in kids science education.
 
Fun fact: I am also trained as a mining engineer!
 
 
TracyWang
 
Tracy Wang
Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at McGill University
 
Number of years volunteering with us: This is my first year volunteering with Let’s Talk Science.
 
Program/area of study: I completed my Bachelor of Arts and Science Degree at McGill University, majoring in Cell and Molecular Biology with a double minor in Economics and English Literature. I am currently enrolled in the Master of Public Policy program at the University of Toronto, starting in the fall of 2014.
 
Favourite outreach activity: I particularly enjoyed representing Let’s Talk Science at the Quebec Aboriginal Science Fair in Wendake, QC.
 
Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? As someone who is interested in many areas including science, I think it is important to emphasize the value of interdisciplinary approaches to problem-solving. There is more to science than facts and theories, and I want to highlight the significance of the scientific method and the logical evidence-based thinking in science. Programs like Let’s Talk Science are essential to promoting science in youth because it gives students the opportunity to see the applicability of science in the real world and brings the expertise of accomplished educators and scientists into the classroom.
 
Fun fact: I once raised 13 frogs!  When my family lived in Texas, my sister and I took tadpoles from a local creek that was drying out and helped the tadpoles develop and metamorphose into frogs. We weren’t sure if they were land or water frogs, so we made individual frog tanks with a little bit of water and a seashell that they could climb onto. They turned out to be land frogs, and we released them when they were full-grown.
 
 
 
 

 

Volunteer Highlights: Saturday

April 12, 2014
 
Happy National Volunteer Week! Every day we will be highlighting some of the amazing volunteers of Let’s Talk Science. See below for today’s spectacular people:
 
Jay
 
Jay (Ji Yeon) Yoon
Let’s Talk Science office volunteer
 
Position, Company (or past position): Clerk , Canada Revenue Agency
 
Number of years volunteering with us:  1 year
 
Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science?: I have a high interested in kids science education.
 
Fun fact: I am also trained as a mining engineer!
 
 
TracyWang
 
Tracy Wang
Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at McGill University
 
Number of years volunteering with us: This is my first year volunteering with Let’s Talk Science.
 
Program/area of study: I completed my Bachelor of Arts and Science Degree at McGill University, majoring in Cell and Molecular Biology with a double minor in Economics and English Literature. I am currently enrolled in the Master of Public Policy program at the University of Toronto, starting in the fall of 2014.
 
Favourite outreach activity: I particularly enjoyed representing Let’s Talk Science at the Quebec Aboriginal Science Fair in Wendake, QC.
 
Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? As someone who is interested in many areas including science, I think it is important to emphasize the value of interdisciplinary approaches to problem-solving. There is more to science than facts and theories, and I want to highlight the significance of the scientific method and the logical evidence-based thinking in science. Programs like Let’s Talk Science are essential to promoting science in youth because it gives students the opportunity to see the applicability of science in the real world and brings the expertise of accomplished educators and scientists into the classroom.
 
Fun fact: I once raised 13 frogs!  When my family lived in Texas, my sister and I took tadpoles from a local creek that was drying out and helped the tadpoles develop and metamorphose into frogs. We weren’t sure if they were land or water frogs, so we made individual frog tanks with a little bit of water and a seashell that they could climb onto. They turned out to be land frogs, and we released them when they were full-grown.
 
 
 
 

 
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